4/14/2005

The Pope and the Profits

In an article in Business Week, The Pope and the Profits , it talks about the profits that are being made by various businesses after the death of the Pope.
E-bay had a huge amount of memorobilla posted on its web page, items from wristbands to comic books. Among the most expensive items were a bottle of holy water blessed by the Pope, at $500,000, and an oil-pastel portrait of John Paul II, signed by him, at $150,000.
Now doesn't this seem a little ubsurd to a certain extent to charge such high prices for items of the Pope and to make money in ways like this? I know that demand is high for items and collectibles pertaining to the Pope, but do we go to far at times? I think that selling items and making money from such things is okay, but I do think that we push it to the extreme.

7 comments:

June said...

I agree, I was watching the news last night and there is some outrage about the sale of sacred items. Somebody was selling a communion wafer that was blessed by the Pope. I think people need to be a little bit more sensitive to others.

Jim said...

It is a fact of life that has been around for as long as I can remember. King's have taken advantage of their people and forced them to pay high prices, nations become gready and want more. So war is forced upon those other nations around them. etc. It is all about assets, income, green paper with our past president's faces on them. Today, the world wants more.

Vincent said...

I agree, it’s appalling to see these things happen especially the communion wafer stated in another comment. These thing do not tarnish the memory of the Pope but enlightens us to how much more work humanity needs.

BOB said...

Vincent made a nice comment. If our society puts such high prices on insignificant items, it does need help. I personally find it hilarious that people are willing to spend so much money for ridiculous things like a wafer or holy water.

trudy said...

Certain things should be considered sacred and I feel terrible that our society doesn't feel the same way. I am also ashamed to say that for the right price I would sale almost everything that I own.

Fred said...

I think that sometimes people definately take things too far, and this is one of those times. But it doesn't really surprise me because some will do anything for a little more money, even exploiting the death of a very honored man.

Dr. Tufte said...

-1 on Trudy and Fred's comments for spelling errors.

This is a good example of problems with markets. There isn't a lot of reason why anything should not be sold. Alternatively, is it ethical to actually do so? Economics has no answer for the latter, other than making it illegal won't make it go away.