3/30/2005

Why Should I Work?

Why should I work when I end up getting less of a government grant for school as a result? Why should I work when I could get my rent for free through subsidized housing? I have a friend who decided, a while back, to quit his job so he could focus more on his schooling. As a result, the government takes care of him and his wife through various welfare programs that are available to low income families. Am I gaining more of an economic benefit than my friend by working while going to school? I know I could get better grades if I could stay at home and study more and live off of government programs. Would better grades and less work experience be better then a lot of work experience and lower grades? Would I be abusing government programs if I do what my friend is doing? I personally think I should work and avoid living off of welfare programs as much as possible. I hope that my future employer(s) feel the same.

13 comments:

salty said...

I agree that a student should try and work to stay off of the governments payroll. I think it shows that you have integrity if you buck up and work while you go to school.

sierra said...

I also agree that students should try and stay offthe governments payroll. I don't like it when people always try for the easy way out. Life is suppose to be tough at times, and that is how we grow. So, as salty said, "buck up and work." Show people that you can handle more responsibility.

Marie said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Marie said...

I do agree that students should work to support themselves. However, I don't think that our government does a very bad job at giving incentives to not use government funding. For example, if a couple was married and had their first child while going to school, there is no way that they would be able to pay or even have insurance that would support them. Over all, however, I think that using government assistance can be avoided

Harry said...

I would also have to agree with the above comments. If you can work to provide for yourself and your family then you should. I have always been taught that in order to get things that you want it takes hard work. I think that if you are just relying on the Government then you are just lazy.

Keston said...

I also agree with all of the above comments and I think that employers will appreciate that you have worked. If an employer can see that you were able to juggle work, school, family, and have a social life, than you would probably get the job over your friend. I also think it will pay off for you in the end because you will know the concept of hard work and not try to rely on someone else to help you get by. Besides as tax payers we are the ones funding those programs so we should all encourage people to work rather than rely on the government.

Bart said...

I dont think that there is anything wrong with letting the govt. help you out when you go to school, think of it as the govt. investing in your future. They may pay you for a few years to go to school but you will be paying them for the rest of your life.

homer said...

My first year of marriage I received a lot of help from financial aid because I hadn't worked much the year before and it helped a lot. I receive much less now but the experience I get from working is just as important as my school education. Those who can balance the two will be rewarded later.

Jane said...

Again, I am appalled at the ignorance of some people. Yes, government programs get abused, some people live off of them their entire lives ... mostly by lying and manipulating the system. Then there are some legitimately needy people who are very willing to work hard, but for one reason or another are unable to.

To call the whole "lazy" is pure ignorance. To say that life is hard and they should "buck up" tells me that all of life's hardships have not befallen you. Count your blessings.

Sometimes the personal economic profits that one obtains from using government programs to help them get through school outweighs the gains from working your way through school.

Dr. Tufte said...

This is a juicy one. At some point in Fair Play Landsburg says that he is going to pay Cayley for good grades rather than let her work.

Personally, I always worked when I was in school, and in retrospect I have a lot of regrets. Most of that effort wasn't worth it. On the other hand, it's not clear to me how much a marginal improvement in my GPA of (say) 0.1 points would have done for me either.

Here's what I think about my own kids (my oldest is 6). I think they should work a bit if they want to. I am absolutely sure that they need more coaching on where to work and how to weigh their options.

As to government help, the really apalling thing to me is that there is no sense in which you are compensated for performance. If the government had any interest in doing good, they would reward people who did well when funded by the government.

Matthew said...

Dr. Tufte said that the government should reward people who did well when funded by the government. I completely agree! There are some people who legitimately need to be on welfare for a time period to get them on their feet, but they need to be set loose after a certain time. It seems as if the government rewards people who perform poorly on welfare with more welfare, and “rewards” those who do well on welfare by kicking them off of welfare. Why should these people try to get off welfare when that seems like a punishment? Punish them when they don't get off welfare in the specified time frame!

Jordan said...

Dr. Tufte said:

"Personally, I always worked when I was in school, and in retrospect I have a lot of regrets. Most of that effort wasn't worth it. On the other hand, it's not clear to me how much a marginal improvement in my GPA of (say) 0.1 points would have done for me either."

I think in a major way it depends on the kind of work you do. If you have to sacrifice some study time to get an internship that will help you apply what you are learning, then I think the sacrifice is well worth it. But if you're sacrificing study time to flip burgers, then it might be time to weigh some options.

Dr. Tufte said...

I think we see professors do quite a bit of what Matthew likes.

The analogy is that professors are the government for a class. Many times they'll help you out in a pinch. If you actually use that to get back on your feet and do better, they'll often "bump" your grade for you. I'd like to see the government do this with welfare recipients.