11/15/2005

Are Newspapers Now Old News

Recently newspaper subscriptions to several of the nation’s largest newspapers have had huge reductions in demand for delivery of their papers. The San Francisco Chronicle saw circulation fall 17 percent for its Wednesday to Saturday editions, while another big beast of the newspaper jungle, the Boston Globe, slumped 8.2 percent to a weekday average of 414,225. The author explains that there are two main reasons for the trends. One, is that the new generations don’t like the old-fashioned newspapers. They prefer to get the news either from the internet, the blogesphere, or from TV. They also cite inaccuracies and the loss of trust as another reason that subscriptions have fallen. With recent news scandals and made up stories it’s no wonder that readers are loosing faith in the printed news. I know I personally, rarely look or even read a newspaper, including the school paper. It will be interesting to see how the world will get it’s news in the future concerning whatever subject.

5 comments:

Bob said...

I don’t see any reason to subscribe to a news paper when the same information and more is offered through the internet. I would rather log on to the newspapers website rather than pay a monthly fee to get a paper that requires me to walk down my stairs in the freezing cold weather to pick up. Technology allows me to save time and money, and eliminates the hassle of trying to read a big newspaper while enjoying a nice breakfast. I think it would be safe to say that a majority of people who read the newspaper are retired or are over 40, and in the next 20 years newspapers will be completely eliminated.

maddy said...

I've never been a big reader of the newspaper other than the comics. It's has to be a generation gap that is causing this. The newer generations are more prone to getting their news from more real-time sources. I would rather have today's news today rather than tomorrow morning.

Dr. Tufte said...

-1 on Jasmine's post for spelling errors.

-1 on Bob's comment for spelling errors.

A factor that is being missed here is that newspapers have come to increasingly rely on the revenue raised by classified ads. E-Bay, and now Google are going to kill the newspapers in this area.

Matthew said...

Dr. Tufte said that newspapers have relied heavily on classified ads and now E-Bay and Google will be able to take that market. That's true – do you think that newspapers will become obsolete? As of yet, books won't become obsolete compared with e-books because real books offer convenience, portability, and ease on the eyes. So will this be true for newspapers? I kind of think that maybe we will start getting free newspapers with a lot of ads in them.

Dr. Tufte said...

It's 3 years down the road from this post, and newspapers are in even worse shape. The New York Times recently fired reporters for reasons of financial exigency for the first time in their history.