3/31/2006

Are We Seeing a Trend?

This latest article in Newsweek spoke of a familiar situation. The article explained that more and more people are reading novels over their computer. This situation reminded me of a case discussed in class. Britannica was once an item that had a bulky volume you had to purchase to get all the information you could ask for. Now its something you can get over the internet or a CD. The question is will books be a thing of the past like Britannica and just be read over a computer?

10 comments:

Blake said...

I don't believe books will become obselete, however, I think it's great that we have the option to access material such as books, etc. over the web, or through a cd on the computer. To me, this would provide authors an even greater forum to inform others of their material. That being said however, I still like having a hard copy of a book because I can get a headache after a while from reading the computer. Also, if you are just reading a novel, a hard copy can often be more portable than a book on computer, showing that there are pros and cons to both forms.

Hannah said...

For the time being I do not believe that books will go the way of the dodo. That is however until they make some kind of portable, inexpensive, non-glaring electronic reading screen. Thus making electronic books a substitute for paper books. Screens currently glare too much, strain the eyes, and are intimidating to large portions of book readers (i.e. Baby-Boomers). If the reading screens overcome the eye straining factor, become readily available, and consumers can easily/cheaply purchase or transfer books electronically, book printers and stores (i.e. Barnes and Noble) will have serious competition because at that point electronic books will become a closer substitute.

Cole said...
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parker said...

I was glad to see this blog topic because it is regarding an issue that has become more and more prevalent in my life. Within the last month alone I have listened to two different books on mp3 and have found that my ability to retain information is greatly enhanced when it is delivered vocally to me. I don't think I have read a paperback book all the way through for entertainment purposes for years. Although that fact is a shame, I am very happy to have found a way to increase my knowledge that offers much greater convenience for me. I find that having the books on mp3 allows me to easily listen to them on my portable mp3 player as opposed to the harder to carry book versions. I definitely do not speak for everyone but as for myself I am an audio book man from here on out because the convenience and retention far outweigh that of books for me. I would not be surprised to see more and more people make full use of books on mp3 and audio tracks as well as on the computer and less use of libraries and paper books.

Cole said...

Books will not become obsolete. Not everyone likes to read from a computer screen. I for one have a hard time reading anything that is too long if it is not on paper. There are however, great advantages of digital books. You can search them, print pages that you want, or even read them from a PDA. I think there is a need for both types of media.

Bryce Larkin said...
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Bryce Larkin said...
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Bryce Larkin said...

I don’t think books will become obsolete due to the fact that people can purchase them over the internet or on CD. The reason Britannica lost their business was because of the high costs. Individual books relatively don’t have the high costs associated with them.

Bryce Larkin said...

On the other hand, if you have a thousand-page book on a CD makes it makes it more convenient to carry with you. Their will be a decline in the amount of books sold but I believe it will not make them obsolete.

Dr. Tufte said...

I think the issue here is whether or not computers will ever be able to duplicate other features of books. What is being missed here is that a book is a bundled good: it is text, portability, tactile sensations, ease on the eyes, and so on, all rolled into one.

Parker: please don't pull a Costanza and try to learn Risk Management from an audio book. ;)>