10/10/2005

Smaller is Better

For all you truck lovers out there, myself included, it may be time to trade our Diesel powered automobiles in for a smaller compact car. Dealerships agree and are going to start supplying these cars so as to meet our demands. In this article it says that on average it costs SUV's over 70 dollars to fill up a tank. That is ridiculous when there are cars out there such as Honda that will cost you half of that, and will run just as good. (We just don't get the great sounding engine).

10 comments:

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Logan said...

I was parked behind a Ford Excursion at the pumps the other day and his bill was $122! It was a sweet ride, black and jacked, but at 122 bucks a pop at the pump, I would rather walk everywhere I go! You're right; it is time to get small and efficient!

emily said...

I am one of those Honda drivers and I totally agree with you. They are so good with gas mileage and price. When i first got my car almost three years ago I could fill my car up for around $15. It was great, but it has also gone up as well. My brother on the other hand drives a diesel and also has a small Toyota. He basically only drives his diesel when he absolutley has to. I think that it is good that the dealerships are being supplied with the smaller trucks to meet the demand. Good thinking!

Tyler said...

Driving a truck from St. George to Cedar City every day ends up costing $150 dollars a week. I figure it would be cheaper (monthly) to move to cedar city and pay rent. I wish that I didn’t need a truck but you can’t very well pull boats, trailers, etc. behind a car. Who knows, at the rate gas prices sit who can afford to put fuel in any of their toys anyways.

Ann said...

I have no problems with trucks or SUV's if you actually do the kinds of activities that requires them. But what's the sense in paying mega bucks for gas for a vehicle when you don't really need it? Smaller cars are much more gas-efficient, and they end up being better for the environment too.

Dan said...

Smaller cars are definiatly nice when it comes to fuel costs. However, another way to debate this would be to do a cost-benefit analysis. Let's start with the benefits: low fuel consumption, save the environment, yada yada. Now look at the costs: ridiculed by friends for driving a "chick car", driving in the winter, no play on dates, guys rolling up on you cause they think there is a girl inside, wrecked vehicle because you didn't see that squirl, and so on. The decision is obvious according to the cost benefit analysis I've just done, if your a guy stay away from the small chick cars. If the above mentioned is not possible then at leaset try to do most of your driving at night.

taylor said...

I own a smaller car that doesn't cost too much to fill up and it works for me, but what about all those who need big trucks for work and such. They can't just trade in their truck and by a smaller car just because of gas prices.

Bob said...

Alex thank you for sparking my interest on the topic of fuel efficient cars. My blog was based on what I read in your blog. I would love to turn my truck in and save money in gas. As you will see if you read my blog I could save over $1,000 next year if I were to downsize to a more fuel efficient car. Unfortunately my hobbies and interests require me to have a truck. For those of you who have trucks just because the ladies dig them but have never pulled anything with it or have had to use the four-wheel drive I recommend taking Alex's advice and downsizing.

Dr. Tufte said...

-1 on Emily's and Dan's comments for spelling errors.

I hate to break it to you folks, but if you don't already own a small car you're unlikely to benefit by switching.

One of the most subtle aspects of economics is that virtually all benefits go to the holders of fixed resources.

This means that if you own a more efficient car before prices rise, then you can benefit (from the perspective of recently rising gas prices your car is a fixed resource).

But, people who switch can't benefit (in general). The reason is that if they switch, they will push up the price of efficient cars. If they don't, then they have to pay for the more expensive gas in an inefficient truck. Either way, you're going to end up paying more.