12/03/2004

Job growth not what predicted, is it really bad?

Every time new job numbers come out there is a negative spin on them. Here is a quote from NBC News that shows my point, “adding just 112,000 new jobs overall in November. It was the weakest gain in five months and about half of what economists had forecast”. Why is this description in the opening paragraph of the story? Why can’t reporters put a positive spin on this and not there normal doom and glum that is ever present in the media. In the same story just further down the page it points out the unemployment rate went down again.

Even though job growth was not what was predicted, any new jobs created is a good thing.

10 comments:

pramahaphil said...

Many try to blame the media of being to liberal, or anti-Bush. The biggest issue is objectivity, reporters aren't supposed to be to one sided as to whether something is good or bad. Isn't it interesting that something needs a negitive spin when a Republican is in the White House, and a positive spin when a Democrat is in the White House.

Bruce Banner said...

Media reporters are supposed to give their story whether there is negative or positive. For some reason if there is a negative headline people tend read it more than if there is a positive headline. I see it as if there is a positive headline, I read the headline and say good and move on. Where as, if there is a more negative headline I tend to read it to find out why.

By the way pramahaphil, I don't think who is in office whether it is republican or democate, there will always be negative and positive headlines or articles in the media.

peter_parker said...

I agree. Plus negative news is what sells. Yesterday, all day long there was the "breaking news" of Urban Myer meeting with Notre Dame officials considering the head coaching job in football. I kept thinking to myself,"This is ridiculous how big of a deal they're making of this." But then I caught myself, we should be happy that the biggest story in Utah is the head coach at the U and not another murder case or child abduction. Some say that Utah is a bubble, but that's okay with me. The other real headlines are important, don't get me wrong and we need to focus on those as well. I am talking about the economy and the war, etc.

Maybe news programs should be forced to have a half-hour slot of bad and negative news and a half-hour slot of the bright side of everything. It might actually have an effect on us.

pramahaphil said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Student 01 said...

Did I strike a liberal nerve with pramahaphil, I didn’t say this was a liberal or conservative issue, I was simply saying that when something good happens no matter how good you can count on the media to put a negative spin on it if they can. You must be one of those people that flaps their jaw before thinking!!! This was a simple obsevation on my part with no politcal bias ivolved.

John West said...

It is unfortunate that there are so many negative things going on in the world that need reporting, but we as a public should be aware of them. I don't think it matters if a reporter puts a so called "negative" spin on the story. Most Americans can read between the lines and decipher what they will from the story.

Jake said...

I agree with John that most of us can read between the lines and recognize the good that comes from a story even if it is portrayed in a negative way. I think we need to form our own point of view regardless of what is portrayed by the media. The number of jobs created in November is great, even if people think it needs to be higher.

As far as Pramahaphil's take that it depends on who is in office, honestly, it doesn't matter who is in office, the media and society are always going to point out the things they think need improvement.

Biancca said...

I don't think the number of jobs that were created is great at all. The actual number really is meaningless. It only matters what the need for jobs is, or the demand as compared to the supply. If the number of jobs is still way below what is required then that is bleak news.

Kova said...

Drama sells! Readers want nasty break-ups, a failing economy, or a corrupt politician in their media.

Also, I don't think that a slower job growth is actually a bad thing. As with inflation, the unemployement rate needs to stay at or above a certain number in order to not negatively effect the economy.

Dr. Tufte said...

I find this sort of statement pretty annoying, because the thinking is so muddy. Bad news does sell though, and maybe they are trained to write in this way.

But, c'mon, what is the point of saying "weakest gain"? Weak is modifying gain, so it is moving a positive number closer to zero. Does that mean they are going to talk about a "strongest loss" sometime in the future? I don't think they will (which shows bias), and I don't think they can effectively use that phrase anyway - it would have to mean a negative number that was closer to zero - hopefully showing that the original phrase was tortured to begin with.

Then there is the "weakest gain in five months". Isn't this saying that the news was good 2 months ago, 3 months ago, and 4 months ago? If it is saying that, then why not just say it?